REDD+ Thesis Now Online

My Division 3 entitled “Mother Earth is not for sale- love and defend her: Forest Carbon in Chiapas, Mexico” can now be accessed online. Follow this link. Abstract: Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) is an international program to price the carbon stored in global forests in order to incentivize conservation. Efforts to introduce REDD+ in countries of the global South have encountered resistance, however, from communities worried that their livelihoods, rights and environmental values would be undermined by the introduction of international…Continue Reading “REDD+ Thesis Now Online”

The PopDev program, where I am a Political Research Fellow, recently published my DifferenTakes issue paper, “Is This the Future We Want? The Green Economy vs. Climate Justice.”  This blog post announced the publication on the Black Sheep Journal. Negotiators, big NGOs, and companies In U.N. environmental summits are promoting the “Green Economy” as a win-win-win for people, the environment and business interests.  Yet global South social movements denounce the Green Economy for serving the interests of transnational corporations and wealthy nations, and for stomping on…Continue Reading “New Colors of Capitalism: REDD+ and the Green Economy”

Pipeline Politics: Indigenous Solidarity and the Climate Crisis

Originally published in The Black Sheep Journal.

 

The Keystone XL pipeline struggle has created new alliances between environmental NGOs opposing the pipeline, and indigenous peoples whose lands it would cross, which the strong presence of indigenous speakers at the recent Forward on Climate rally in DC illustrated . For environmentalists Keystone represents “game over” for climate change. For indigenous peoples it is another development project imposed without Free, Prior and Informed Consent, which will not benefit their communities. For these alliances to last beyond the limelight of the Keystone fight, grassroots activists of non-native backgrounds must ground their solidarity in a commitment to supporting long-standing indigenous struggles.

My involvement began on August 31, 2011 when I joined the first major tar sands action in Washington, DC, and was arrested for taking part in non-violent civil disobedience in front of the White House, calling on President Obama to reject the Keystone XL pipeline. Despite protests, the southern leg of the pipeline is already under construction as are numerous pipeline projects in Canada, including Pacific Trails and Northern Gateway. Near where I live in New England, the Enbridge Trailbreaker is proposed to bring tar sands oil from Ontario to Portland, Maine. Even if we strike down Keystone, it is just one arm of the strategy of energy companies to transport tar sands oil and fracked natural gas to the coasts. The struggle against Keystone is quickly expanding to join with efforts against other pipelines.

Continue Reading "Pipeline Politics: Indigenous Solidarity and the Climate Crisis"
Oil and Natural Gas Frontlines: First Nations Lead the Way

This post originally appeared on the blog of the Population and Development Program, based in Amherst, MA, which works at the intersection of reproductive freedom, environmental justice and peace. (However since then it’s made the rounds to Common Dreams, It’s Getting Hot in Here, and WeArePowershift.org. Perhaps my most cross-posted blog yet. I’m gratified to see this under-reported aspect of the tar sands issue getting some attention.) American environmentalists are declaring victory over the announcement that the United States will research alternate routes for the…Continue Reading “Oil and Natural Gas Frontlines: First Nations Lead the Way”

My post just went up on the Population and Development Program’s blog  about their recent convening, “Bridging Movements to Build Climate Justice,” which I attended in Tarrytown, NY.  The convening brought together grassroots and non-profit leaders in the environmental and climate justice movements with the reproductive justice movement. Here’s a peak at my reflection, then go on over to PopDev to read the full post: “As the Occupy movement continues to spread, the convening also gave me tools to bring my values and perspectives into other…Continue Reading “Bridging Movements to Build Climate Justice”

This semester at Hampshire College I’m blogging with the Population and Development Program, which works at the intersection of environmental justice and reproductive justice to counter ideas about overpopulation.  This post builds off my September 1st post on the Tar Sands action in Washington, DC to explore the resistance which indigenous communities have mounted against pipelines for many years, and paths forward from the Keystone XL decision. Here’s a peak at the post, and a powerful video, then head over to the PopDev blog to…Continue Reading “Resisting the Tar Sands: Bridging Communities and Struggles”

Cross-posted from Imagine 2050, blog of the Center for New Community. Saturday, February 26, I attended a public hearing in Worcester, MA, on the “Secure Communities Act” of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency (ICE). Community groups and individuals from Worcester and surrounding areas sent a clear message to the governor: “No” to Secure Communities and enforcement-only immigration policy, and “Yes” to a comprehensive approach on immigration. The hearing was the first in a series of community meetings across Massachusetts to bring public input to…Continue Reading “what is “secure communities” really about?”